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Pence Aide Cooperating With Jan 6 Panel12/07 06:19

   The former chief of staff to Vice President Mike Pence is cooperating with 
the House panel investigating the Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection, according to a 
person familiar with the matter.

   WASHINGTON (AP) -- The former chief of staff to Vice President Mike Pence is 
cooperating with the House panel investigating the Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection, 
according to a person familiar with the matter.

   Marc Short was at the Capitol on Jan. 6 and accompanied Pence as he fled his 
post presiding over the Senate and hid from rioters who were calling for his 
hanging. Short is cooperating with the panel after receiving a subpoena, 
according to the person, who was granted anonymity to discuss the private 
interactions.

   Former President Donald Trump was openly criticizing his vice president even 
as the insurrectionists broke into the building because Pence had said he would 
not try to unilaterally reject the electoral count as Congress certified 
President Joe Biden's victory. Pence didn't have the legal power to do so, but 
Trump pressured him anyway.

   As Pence's top aide, Short was also present for several White House meetings 
ahead of the insurrection. At one point, Trump banned Short from the White 
House grounds because he objected to the pressure on Pence to reject the 
legitimate election results.

   CNN first reported Short's cooperation and subpoena.

   Some people close to Pence were furious about the way that Trump tried to 
scapegoat the former vice president on Jan. 6 and became even more incensed 
after Pence, his closest aides and his family were put in physical danger by 
the rioters.

   Alyssa Farah, who served as Pence's press secretary before taking on other 
roles and left her job at the White House before Jan. 6, voluntarily met with 
Republicans on the House select committee and provided information.

   In a series of tweets as the insurrection unfolded, Farah urged Trump to 
condemn the riots as they were happening and call on his supporters to stand 
down. "Condemn this now, @realDonaldTrump," she tweeted. "You are the only one 
they will listen to. For our country!"

   The panel in November subpoenaed Keith Kellogg, who was Pence's national 
security adviser, writing in the subpoena that he was with Trump as the attack 
unfolded and may "have direct information about the former president's 
statements about, and reactions to, the Capitol insurrection." The committee 
wrote that according to several accounts, Kellogg urged Trump to send out a 
tweet aimed at helping to control the crowd.

   The Jan. 6 panel has spoken to more than 250 witnesses, most of them 
voluntarily, committee leaders said last week, and plans a series of open 
hearings next year to make many of their findings public.

   The committee has deposed a wide range of people, from Trump's own aides to 
organizers of his massive rally that morning to allies outside the White House 
who strategized how to overturn Biden's legitimate victory.

   The panel has also interviewed election officials in crucial swing states 
such as Georgia, Arizona, Michigan and Pennsylvania who were pressured by the 
former president and his allies as he pushed false claims of election fraud.

   Trump has derided the committee's work and continued to make claims about 
fraud that have been widely rejected by courts and election experts.

 
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